Undergraduate Program

Program Overview

“All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.”

—IBM Manual, 1925

The undergraduate Electrical Engineering degree at Mines strives to produce future leaders who can serve the profession, the community, and society. We do this by:

  • Providing a breadth and epth of technical expertise as it applies to various applications in the broad fields of electrical engineering
  • Supplementing technical education with training in professional skills including ethics, communication, societal responsibilities, and team-work
  • Creating a student-centered learning environment based on curricular innovation

The undergraduate EE degree at Mines caters to various industries including electric power and energy, renewable energy, aerospace, communications, robotics, and diverse industries that rely on embedded intelligence to manage data and systems. Students graduate with relevant and cutting edge technical knowledge through the core courses and very well-designed specialized electives in the areas of energy systems and power electronics, antennas and wireless communications, information and systems sciences, and integrated circuits and electronics. Undergraduate students in the department have the opportunity to participate in research projects along with  graduate students and the faculty.

Why Electrical Engineering?

Electrical Engineering has had one of the most significant impacts on human life in the 21st century. It was at the crux of the invention of devices that we utilize daily and has improved the quality of human life. It is also a core contributor in solving several grand engineering challenges such as the energy crisis by making solar more economical, reverse engineering the brain to advance manufacturing and communication, and enhancing virtual reality to improve healthcare.

According to EngineerSalary.com, electrical engineers (EEs) hold about 319,100 jobs making this the second largest branch of the US engineering community. The same source also suggests that there has been a sharp decline in the number of EE graduates since 2003 which will result in an imbalance between the number of job openings for EEs and the number of graduates in the coming years.

The Sloan Career Cornerstone Center has collected a number of resources of interest to Electrical Engineers, such as a “Day in the Life” description, employment statisticsprofiles of professional engineers, and more

Not convinced? Watch these videos.

Program Objectives and Outcomes

Program Educational Objectives

Within three years of attaining the BSEE degree:

a. Graduates will be applying their professional Electrical Engineering skills and training in their chosen field or will be successfully pursuing a graduate degree.

b. Graduates will be situated in growing careers, generating new knowledge and exercising professional leadership.

c. Graduates will be contributing to the needs of society through professional practice, research, and service.

Student Outcomes

The Student Outcomes of the BSEE program are:

a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

d. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

g. an ability to communicate effectively

h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

j. a knowledge of contemporary issues

k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Curriculum

Students in the Electrical Engineering program complete a set of core courses that include mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering sciences during their first two years. Course work in mathematics is an essential part of the curriculum, which gives engineering students essential tools for modeling, analyzing, and predicting physical phenomena. The basic sciences are represented by physics and chemistry, which provide an appropriate foundation in the physical sciences. Engineering sciences build upon the basic sciences and are focused on applications.

The first two years also includes Engineering design course work within the Engineering Practice Introductory Course (EPICS I). This experience teaches design methodology and stresses the creative and synthesis aspects of the engineering profession. Finally, the first two years includes systems-oriented courses with humanities and social sciences content; these courses explore the linkages within the environment, human society, and engineered devices.

In the final two years, students complete an advanced core that includes circuit analysis, electronics, electromagnetic fields and waves, and digital systems. Because of our program focus, the core curriculum also includes courses in signal processing, embedded microprocessor systems design, machines and power systems, and control systems. Students can also take specialized electives that further develop their expertise in one of these focus areas, or in other areas such as robotics, biomedical engineering, and computing.

In their final year, students complete a capstone design course that is focused on an in-depth engineering project. The projects are generated by customer demand, and include experiential verification to ensure a realistic design experience.

The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The enrollment and graduation data for the Electrical Engineering program and other Mines programs can be found on the home page of the Office of Institutional Research.

Engineering Core

The Engineering core consists of the following 3 courses:

  • EGGN-491 Senior Design I
  • EGGN-492 Senior Design II
  • EGGN-XXX Statics or Thermo

Electrical Engineering Core

The Electrical Engineering core consists of the following 12 courses:

  • EENG-282 Electrical Circuits
  • EENG-284 Digital Logic
  • EENG-307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems
  • EENG-310 Information systems science
  • EENG-311 Information Systems Science II
  • EENG-334 Engineering Field Session, Electrical
  • EENG-382 Engineering Circuit Analysis
  • EENG-383 Microcomputer Architecture & Interfacing
  • EENG-385 Electronic Devices & Circuits
  • EENG-386 Fundamentals of Engineering Electromagnetics
  • EENG-389 Fundamentals of Electric Machinery
  • EENG-450 Systems Exploration and Engineering Design (SEED) Lab

Electrical Engineering Electives

In addition to the core courses listed above, students must take at least 9 credit hours of elective electrical engineering courses, selected from the following list:

  • CEEN-405 Numerical Methods for Engineers
  • CSCI-341 Computer Organization
  • CSCI-410 Elements of Computing Systems
  • CSCI-440 Parallel Comp for Scientists and Engineers
  • EENG-411 Digital Signal Processing
  • EENG-413 Analog & Digital Communication Systems
  • EENG-417 Modern Control Design
  • EENG-425 Introduction to Antennas
  • EENG-427 Wireless Communications
  • EENG-470 Intro to High Power Electronics
  • EENG-472 Practical Design of Small Renewable Energy Systems
  • EENG-480 Power Systems Analysis
  • EENG-481 Analysis & Design of Adv Energy Sys
  • EENG-489 Computational Methods in Energy Systems and Power
  • MATH-334 Introduction to Probability
  • MATH-335 Intro to Mathematical Statistics
  • MATH-455 Partial Differential Equations
  • MEGN-330 Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering
  • MEGN-441 Introduction to Robotics
  • PHGN-300 Modern Physics I
  • PHGN-320 Modern Physics II: Basics of Quantum Mechanics
  • PHGN-412 Introduction to Mathematical Physics
  • PHGN-435 Interdisciplinary Microelectronics Processing Labo
  • PHGN-440 Solid State Physics
  • PHGN-441 Solid State Physics Applications & Phenomena
  • PHGN-462 Electromagnetic Waves & Optical Physics

Additional EENG 400 level graduate level classes taught in the EE department can be considered as tech electives. Talk to your advisor for further guidance. 300 level or higher courses from other departments can be approved by the Department Head.

Free Electives

Also in addition to the core course requirements, students must also earn an additional 9 hours of free electives. Unlike the Electrical Engineering Electives, the free elective hours are not restricted to courses within the department but rather may be use for minors or majors with other departments or simply to take classes that you find interesting.

See the Mines Catalog for the complete course list and descriptions

Sample Curriculum

Freshman Year, Fall Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
CHGN 121 Principles of Chemistry I 4.0
GEGN 101 Earth and Environmental Systems, CBEN 110, CSCI 101, CHGN 122 or CHGN 125 (Distributed Science I. May not use both CHGN 122 and 125 4.0
MATH 111 Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I 4.0
LAIS 100 Nature and Human Values 4.0
CSM 101 Freshman Success Seminar 0.5
PAGN Elective Physical Activity Course 0.5

 

Freshman Year, Spring Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
MATH 112 Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II 4.0
EPIC 151 Design (EPICS) I 3.0
PHGN 100 Physics I – Mechanics 4.5
CSCI 101 Introduction to Computer Science, CBEN 110, GEGN 101, CHGN 122 or CHGN 125 (DIstributed Science 2. May not use both CHGN 122 and CHGN 125) 3.0
PAGN Elective Physical Activity Course 0.5

 

Sophomore Year, Fall Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
LAIS 200 Human Systems 3.0
MATH 213 Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III 4.0
PHGN 200 Physics II – Electromagnetism and Optics 4.5
CSCI 261 Programming Concepts 3.0
PAGN Elective Physical Activity Course 0.5

 

Sophomore Year, Spring Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
MATH 225 Differential Equations 3.0
EBGN 201 Principles of Economics 3.0
EENG 284 Digital Logic 4.0
EENG 282 Electrical Circuits 4.0
PAGN Elective Physical Activity Course 0.5

 

Junior Year, Fall Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
MATH 332 Linear Algebra 3.0
MEGN 361 Thermodynamics I or CEEN 241 3.0
EENG 307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 3.0
EENG 310 Information Systems Science I 4.0
EENG 383 Microcomputer Architecture and Interfacing 4.0

 

Junior Year, Spring Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
EENG 385 Electronic Devices and Circuits 4.0
EENG 386 Fundamentals of Engineering Electromagnetics 3.0
EENG 389 Fundamentals of Electric Machinery 4.0
EENG 311 Information Systems Science II 3.0

 

Junior Year, Summer

 

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EENG 334 Electrical Engineering Field Session 3.0

 

Senior Year, Fall Semester

 

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Course Title Seminar Hours
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective I 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective II 3.0
EENG 450 Systems Exploration and Engineering Design Lab 1.0
EGGN 491 Senior Design I 3.0
EENG Elective Electrical Engineering Elective 3.0
EENG Elective Electrical Engineering Elective 3.0

 

Senior Year, Spring Semester

 

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Course Title Semester Hours
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective III 3.0
EGGN 492 Senior Design II 3.0
EENG Elective Electrical Engineering Elective 3.0
FREE Free Elective 3.0
FREE Free Elective 3.0
FREE Free Elective 3.0

 

EE Undergraduate Curriculum Recent Activities
Flowcharts

These flowcharts have been created to help you understand the requirements for your degree program. In addition, you should know that:

  • Degree requirements change over time. Your requirements are determined based on the year you entered the degree program.
  • You can switch to a later catalog, if you desire. Forms are available at the registrar’s office. Will require a signature from your advisor.
  • You may not switch to an earlier catalog. Flowcharts from prior years are included here for the benefit of students who entered during those years.

Hardcopies of these flowcharts/worksheets are also available just outside the department office in Brown Building 339. If your date is not represented below, please see the department office.

So as not to confuse or mislead, these flowcharts simply represent a sample curriculum. If there are any discrepancies between this information and other sources, the final authority is the catalog published the year the student entered Mines.

BS + MS Combined Program

The Electrical Engineering Department offers a combined program in which students have the opportunity to supplement an undergraduate degree with graduate coursework. Upon completion of the program, students receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering

Students are required to take an additional 30 credit hours for the M.S. degree. Up to nine of the 30 credit hours beyond the undergraduate degree requirements can be 4XX level courses. The remainder of the courses will be at the graduate level (5XX and above). Effective Fall 2018, students admitted to the combined degree program can double-count up to 6 credits of EENG 500-level courses completed with a grade of B- or better. Students taking 500-level courses must obtain approval from their advisor and the course instructor using a 500-level course enrollment form obtained from the Registrar's Office. For a course to count toward the graduate degree, it is important that students be accepted into the combined program prior to Census Day.

The EE Graduate Catalog provides details for this program and includes specific instructions regarding required and elective courses.

Students may switch from the combined program which includes a non-thesis Master of Science degree to a M.S. degree with a thesis option; however, if students change degree programs they must satisfy all degree requirements for the M.S. with thesis degree.

 

Admission Criteria

  • Students must apply to enter this program by the beginning of their senior year
  • Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0

Application Procedure

  • At the beginning of the Senior year, a pro forma graduate school application is submitted and as long as the undergraduate portion of the program is successfully completed, the student is admitted to the Engineering graduate program.
  • Complete the Online Application
  • For online applications from Mines undergraduates, the application fee is only $25.
  • Students are not required to take the GRE.
  • Students must submit a transcript.
  • Students should not take 500-level courses until they are admitted into the program. You must be admitted by Census Day of the
  • semester you begin to take graduate courses.
  • Since you are not allowed to "officially" work on both degrees at the same time, you must enter a date for "expected BS completion date" on the Educational Information page of the online application. Then enter an Intended Entry semester for the graduate program that is after that date. You will need to get permission to take a 500-level course prior to receiving your BS degree. You should check the box for Graduate Credit only. If you have been accepted into the program prior to taking any graduate courses, those credits should automatically transfer to your MS degree as soon as you receive your undergraduate degree.

Financial Aid

Upon completion of their undergraduate degree requirements, a Combined Degree Program student is considered enrolled full-time in his/her graduate program. Once having done so, the student is no longer eligible for undergraduate financial aid, but may now be eligible for graduate financial aid. To complete their graduate degree, each Combined Degree Program student must register as a graduate student for at least one semester.

Engineering Physics and Chemistry Combined Programs

The Electrical Engineering Department, in collaboration with the Departments of Physics and Chemistry, offers five-year programs in which students have the opportunity to obtain specific engineering skills to complement their physics or chemistry background. Physics or chemistry students in this program fill in their technical and free electives over their standard four year Engineering Physics or Chemistry B.S. program with a reduced set of Electrical Engineering classes. At the end of the fourth year, the student is awarded an Engineering Physics B.S. or Chemistry B.S., as appropriate. Course schedules for these five-year programs can be obtained in the EE, Physics and Chemistry Departmental Offices.

Emphasis Areas, Minor, and ASI

BSEE with emphasis

EE majors can choose to get more in depth knowledge in a specific area by choosing 12 credits of technical electives in a specific area. The 4 emphasis areas are Information Systems and Science, Antennas and Wireless Communications, Energy Systems and Power Electronics, and Integrated Circuits and Electronics. The list of electives can be seen here.

Minor in Electrical Engineering

A minimum of eighteen credits are required for a Minor in Electrical Engineering as follows.

Students must complete an eighteen-credit hour sequence as described below for a minor in EE. All students seeking a minor in EE will need to take one of two possible versions of Electrical Circuits  and EENG 307 (3 credits) after which they can pick an emphasis area to complete the remaining minor requirements. The four emphasis areas are as follows

1. Information Systems and Science (ISS), 18 or 18.5 credits

  • EENG 282 Electrical Circuits OR EENG 281 Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power and EGGN 250 Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory 4.0
  • EENG 307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 3.0
  • EENG 284 Digital Logic 4.0
  • EENG 310 Information Systems Science I 4.0
  • EENG 311 Information Systems Science II 3.0

2. Energy Systems and Power (ESPE), 18 credits

  • EENG 282 Electrical Circuits 4.0
  • EENG 307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 3.0
  • EENG 385 Electronic Devices and Circuits 4.0
  • EENG 386 Fundamentals of Engineering Electromagnetics 3.0
  • EENG 389 Fundamentals of Electric Machinery 4.0

3. Digital Systems, 18 or 18.5 credits

  • EENG 282 Electrical Circuits OR EENG 281 Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power and EGGN 250 Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory 4.0
  • EENG 307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 3.0
  • EENG 284 Digital Logic 4.0
  • EENG 383 Microcomputer Architecture and Interfacing
  • EENG 421 Semiconductor Device Physics and Design

4. General Electrical Engineering, 19 or 19.5 credits

  • EENG 282 Electrical Circuits OR EENG 281 Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power and EGGN 250 Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory 4.0
  • EENG 307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 3.0
  • EENG 284 Digital Logic 4.0
  • EENG 310 Information Systems Science I 4.0
  • EENG 385 Electronic Devices and Circuits 4.0

MINor in computer engineering

The Computer Engineering minor combines key software and hardware concepts, such as programming skills and digital circuit design, to create hardware-software systems that are used in embedded systems. Students must take at least 18 credits from the classes below. At least 9 of which must be 300-level or above.

  • CSCI-261: Programming Concepts
  • CSCI-262: Data Structures
  • CSCI-341: Computer Organization
  • CSCI-442: Operating Systems
  • EENG-281: Intro to Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power or EENG 282: Electrical Circuits
  • EENG-284: Digital Logic
  • EENG-383: Microcomputer Architecture
  • PHGN215/317 may be substituted for EENG281/284 with approval

*If a student is in a major that does not require CSCI261, the student must take only three of the CSCI courses.

ASI in Electrical Engineering

The following twelve credit sequence is required for an ASI in Electrical Engineering:

  • EENG 281 Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power 3.0
  • EENG 307 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 3.0
  • EENG 386 Fundamentals of Engineering Electromagnetics 3.0
  • EENG 417 Modern Control Design or EENG 421 Semiconductor Device Physics and Design 3.0
Student Organizations

IEEE Student Chapter LogoThe Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is an organization dedicated to the advancement of the study and application of electrical phenomena. The international organization works with students, educators, professionals and researchers to foster an environment of collaboration and advancement through the publication of journals, the establishment of professional societies and the hosting of symposiums.

The Colorado School of Mines Student Chapter of IEEE works to further this mission in our specific area by:

  • Advancing the knowledge of and fostering interest in the Electrical Engineering discipline throughout the campus
  • Educating and developing current Electrical Engineering students
  • Providing a medium through which academia and industry are linked

To this end, we conduct monthly meetings, visit industrial facilities, host tutoring session for circuits classes, and build projects to further our mission. We invite you to join us. Please look around our website to find out about who we are and what we do. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to contact us!